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win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could have been, but he did things behind the scenes that were important. >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a near great president? or a great president? >> i would say he's great. i think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created -- in 1952, '53, the political climate, i think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if
versus board. i said i think this is the civil rights issue of our generation. the dividing line is not race or class, but around educational opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap, we have to close the opportunity gap. i do not think we have had anything near the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those gaps that we need to. to look at the staggering inequities and inequalities, we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president has provided leadership. he understands what is at stake. congress has been supportive. we have to work on this together and put politics and the ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy. i talk about a cradle to career agenda. we have to start with early childhood education. i could make a compelling case that is the best investment we can make. if we can get our babies into kindergarten and ready to read, we start to close the gaps. if we do not do that, we're playing catch-up. we play catch up at every level of the education system. many of our colleges today, 50% of yo
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
strengthening our economy that we defend the civil liberties and rights of every new hampshire citizen because we want to attract people of all -- of talent and energy to the states meaning defending our marriage equality law and making sure that women can chart their own destinies making their own health care decisions. >> a lot of the public debate between you has been on social issues. now, any of the social issues that you disagree on, how much impact do they have on the economy in the business of new hampshire? >> you know? i was on a plane last spring, and i sat next to a young man who recruits for business, and he told me how important the marriage equality law we passed was to his recruiting efforts because young people were interested in coming to new hampshire to worng here because we were committed to treating all granted staters equally. similarly, for women, the ability to make their own decisions about when to have families, about what kind of balance they want to seek in the workplace, finishing schools, and all of those things relate to their ability to control their own decisi
into what is already a very deep-seated lack of trust that people have for him. >> right. michael, is mr. romney proud or ashamed of his signature achievement in massachusetts? i would expect most politicians in the civilized world would regard medical care for children as being a major success story. >> yeah. he's actually been pretty consistent in defending what he did in massachusetts, even as he attacks obama care. the issue is less that he's changing his position. it's just that he's slicing this issue very finely. he objects to obama care on a number of very narrow grounds, even though on the stump he sounds like he's objecting to it broadly. he doesn't think the federal government should be doing it, he thinks it's okay if the state government does it, he doesn't think taxes should be raised and he's against the medicare advantage cuts. this is consistent for him since the beginning of the campaign. the problem is his rhetoric sounds like he objects to obama care on a much broader -- >> but, michael, the central issue is the individual mandate. >> that's right. >> and he's having
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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